Dr. Tovi Lehmann

Entomologist

Dr. Tovi Lehmann

Entomologist

Biography

Dr. Tovi Lehmann received his Ph.D. degree in Entomology in 1994 from the University of Arizona, and with an American Society for Microbiology Fellowship, took a postdoctoral position in the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where he studied the population genetics of the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae with Drs. Frank Collins and Nora Besansky. Three years later, he accepted a research entomologist position in CDC, where he studied both mosquitoes and the molecular epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. In 2004, he joined the laboratory of malaria and vector research in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to expand studies on the ecology of malaria in Africa. Prior to working on mosquitoes, he has conducted field studies on behavior and ecology of lizards, gerbils, and fleas. As a PhD student in Arizona, he studied nematodes causing onchocerciasis (river blindness) and the blackflies that transmit them to people. Over twenty years, he has studied the ecology of the African malaria mosquito, contributing to new insights into the nature of geographical and behavioral barriers to gene flow, mechanisms affecting mosquito survival though the long dry season, and mosquito long-distance travel, powered by winds. These endeavors brought him to Africa and provided the opportunity to work closely with colleagues, including Drs. Adama Dao, Alpha Yaro, and Abdoulaye Diabate (among others), spending weeks in villages, where he has been fortunate to experience the culture, the rhythms, the beauty, and wisdom of local people. Interested in malaria transmission and control, mosquito speciation, and the factors that shape susceptibility to human pathogens in mosquito populations, he has undertaken different research projects and has authored and co-authored over 100 scientific papers.